Selecting a Subcommittee

CHI 2014 anticipates submission of over 1,900 Papers and Notes. The review process needs to handle this load while also providing high-quality reviews. The organization of the CHI program committee into topical subcommittees helps achieve this by having you, the author, select the best subcommittee to review your submission.

The subcommittee structure empowers you to choose the appropriate community of researchers to review your research. An important thing to consider in selecting a subcommittee is that you are not describing your paper, you are instead providing information about your most important contribution and therefore the type of researcher who you feel is most qualified to review your paper.

Notes:

Guidance

The author decides which subcommittee reviews his or her submission. When you submit a paper or note, you will designate which subcommittee you want to handle your submission. You will see a list of subcommittees and descriptions of the topics they are covering, the name of each Subcommittee Chair, and the names of some of the Associate Chairs serving on each subcommittee. Using all of this information, it is your responsibility to select the subcommittee that best matches the expertise needed to assess your research, and that you believe will most fully appreciate your contribution to the field of HCI.

CHI has traditionally supported diverse and interdisciplinary work and continues to expand into new topics not previously explored. We recognize that as a result, you may find several different subcommittees which are plausible matches for aspects of your work. Hence it may be difficult to choose between subcommittees. However, for a number of reasons it will be necessary for you to select one target subcommittee, and you should strive to find the best match based on what you think is the main contribution of your submission (examples of papers that are considered good matches are linked below for each subcommittee). You can also email the Subcommittee Chairs for guidance if you are unsure.

Note that the scope of each subcommittee is not rigidly defined. Each has a broad mandate and most subcommittees cover a collection of different topics. Further, Subcommittee Chairs are all seasoned researchers, experienced with program committee review work, and each is committed to a process which seeks to assign each paper reviewers who are true experts in whatever the subject matter of the paper is. Subcommittee Chairs recognize that many papers, or perhaps even most papers, will not perfectly fit the definition of their subcommittee's scope. Consequently, papers will not be penalized or downgraded because they do not align perfectly with a particular subcommittee. Interdisciplinary, multi-topic, and cross-topic papers are encouraged, and will be carefully and professionally judged by all subcommittees.

In making a subcommittee choice you should make careful consideration of what the most central and salient contribution of your work is, even if there are several different contributions. As an example, let's say you are writing a paper about Ergonomic Business Practices for the Elderly using Novel Input Devices. Perhaps this is a very new topic. It covers a lot of ground. It's not an exact fit for any of the subcommittees, but several choices are plausible. To choose between them, you need to make a reasoned decision about the core contributions of your work. Should it be evaluated in terms of the usage context for the target user community? The novel methodology developed for your study? The system and interaction techniques you have developed? Each of these evaluation criteria may partially apply, but try to consider which is most central and which you most want to highlight for your readers. Also look at the subcommittees, the people who will serve on them, and the kind of work they have been associated with in the past. Even if there are several subcommittees that could offer fair and expert assessments of this work, go with the one that really fits the most important and novel contributions of your paper. That committee will be in the best position to offer constructive and expert review feedback on the contributions of your research.

Each subcommittee description also links one or two recent CHI papers that the subcommittee chairs feel are good examples of papers that fit the intent and aim of that subcommittee. Please look at these examples as a way to decide on the best subcommittee for your paper - but remember that these are just a few examples, and do not specify the full range of topics that would fit with any subcommittee. (Note: the example papers will be linked as they are selected by the chairs).

List of the subcommittees

Subcommittees are listed and described below. Each has a title, short description, and an indication of who will Chair and serve on the subcommittee. Subcommittees have been constructed with an eye to maintaining logically coherent clusters of topics. These are largely as set up for CHI 2010 with some changes, in part as a result of the need to balance the expected number of papers for each subcommittee and in part based on experiences in 2010.

User Experience and Usability

This subcommittee is suitable for papers that contribute by extending the knowledge, approaches, practices, methods, components and tools that make technology more useful, usable and desirable. Successful papers will present results, practical approaches, tools, technologies and research methods that demonstrably advance our understanding and design capabilities for user experience and/or usability. The focus is on usability of widely used technologies. Applications targeting select user groups (e.g., accessibility) should be submitted to the Specific Applications subcommittee. Contributions will be judged substantially on the basis of their demonstrable potential for effective reuse and applicability across a range of application domains and/or design, research, or user communities.

Chairs:

Manfred Tscheligi
Jettie Hoonhout

Subcommittee:

Judy Kay
Patrick Olivier
Winslow Burleson
Effie Law
Evangelos Karapanos
John Thomas
Mark Dunlop
Luciano Gamberini
Richard Beckwith
Dominic Furniss
Daniela Busse
Marco de Sá
John Vines
Lynne Baillie
Wendy Moncur
Jesper Kjeldskov
Patrick Rau
David Geerts

Example Papers and Notes:

Specific Application Areas

This subcommittee will focus on papers that extend the design and understanding of applications for specific application areas or domains of interest to the HCI community. Examples of potential user groups of interest include, but are not limited to: older adults, children, families, disabled people, people in developing countries, and people with perceptual, cognitive, or motor impairments. Examples of application areas include, but are not limited to: education, health, home, sustainability, ict4d, security, privacy and creativity. These contributions will be evaluated in part based on their impact on the specific application area and/or group that they address, in addition to their impact on HCI.

Chairs:

Wanda Pratt
Hilary Hutchinson
Bill Thies
Jon Froelich
Vicki Hanson
Joanna McGrenere

Subcommittee:

Chris Quintana
Svetlana Yarosh
Nadir Weibel
Jina Huh
Lauren Wilcox
Amy Ogan
Andrea Parker
Predrag Klasnja
Julie Kientz
Mona Leigh Guha
Tom Moher
Judith Good
Helena Mentis
Serge Egelman
Robert Miller
A.J. Brush
Angela Sasse
Nithya Sambasivan
Alexander De Luca
Paul Aoki
John Canny
Rob Comber
Mike Hazas
Elaine Huang
Patrick Gage Kelley
Christopher Power
Karyn Moffatt
Kasper Hornbæk
Krzysztof Gajos
Erin Carroll
Tiago Guerreiro
Andrew Sears
Annalu Waller
Brian Bailey
Faustina Hwang
Melanie Tory
Hironobu Takagi
Maria Wolters

Example Papers:

Interaction Beyond the Individual

We focus on papers and notes which consider how two or more people interact with one another through technology, in groups of two people to two million. Submissions will be judged in part by their contribution of data and interpretation; description and analysis of systems to support relationships and interactions; and/or theories and well-structured arguments regarding human communication, collaboration, conflict, play, and other activities supported or mediated by technologies.

Chairs:

Myriam Lewkowicz
Mark Ackerman

Subcommittee:

Alexander Boden
Antonella de Angeli
Emilee Rader
Gabriela Avram
Jaime Teevan
Marilyn McGee-Lennon
Michael Muller
Michal Jacovi
Ning Gu
Rogério De Paula
Sadat Shami
Sarita Yardi Schoenebeck
Sean Munson
Susan Fussell
Volker Wulf
Xiaomu Zhou
Carl Gutwin
Deborah Tatar
Daniel Russell

Example Papers:

Design

This subcommittee will focus on papers that make a contribution to the design of interactive products, services, or systems; or that advance knowledge of the human activity of design as it relates to HCI. It will cover a broad range of design approaches: participatory, user-centered, experience, and service. It will also cover a range of design practices: interaction, industrial, experience, information, architecture, visual communication, and sensorial. Finally, it will focus on design research issues such as aesthetics, values, effects (such as emotion), methods, practices, critique, and theory.

This subcommittee is also the home for papers related to the design of computer games.

Chairs:

Bilge Mutlu
John Zimmerman
Ron Wakkary
Youn-Kyung Lim

Subcommittee:

Christina Satchell
Darren Edge
Jeffrey Bardzell
Jodi Forlizzi
Wendy Ju
Zachary Toups
Zhiyong Fu
Katharina Reinecke
Giulio Jacucci
Lilly Irani
Stuart Reeves
Silvia Lindtner
Aisling Kelliher
Carman Neustaedter
Christopher Le Dantec
Corina Sas
Elise van den Hoven
Ian Oakley
Joonhwan Lee
Lennart Nacke
Mark Blythe
Scott Davidoff
Steven Dow
Ingrid Mulder
Steve Harrison
Ylva Fernaeus

Example Papers:

Interaction Using Specific Capabilities or Modalities

This subcommittee will focus on advances in interaction that use capabilities, modalities, or technologies that have not yet been fully exploited in standard approaches to interaction. These contributions will be judged in part by their novelty and their ability to extend user capabilities in powerful new ways or to new contexts. Example areas include, but are not limited to: multimodal user interfaces, tangible interfaces, speech I/O, auditory I/O, physiological computing, brain-computer interfaces, perception and vision-based systems, augmented reality, and visualisation.

Chairs:

Stephen Fairclough
Sriram Subramanian

Subcommittee:

Aaron Quigley
Pierre Dragicevic
Jason Alexander
Hrvoje Benko
Petra Isenberg
Shendong Zhao
Abhijit Karnik
Dan Morris
Thorsten Zander
Andreas Bulling
Erin Solovey
Clifton Forlines
Andreas Butz
David McGookin
Tim Bickmore
Niklas Elmqvist
Wolfgang Stuerzlinger
Jürgen Steimle

Example Papers:

Understanding People: Theory, Concepts, Methods

This subcommittee will focus on papers whose primary contribution is improved understanding of people and/or interactional contexts, as applied to address HCI problems. This understanding can be derived from qualitative or quantitative research, and can be study-based or more conceptual in nature. The core contribution is likely to take the form of evolved theories, concepts or methods. These contributions will be judged in part by their extension of our basic understanding of human behavior and/or their context of activity and the practical impact this may have on HCI practice and research.

Chairs:

Victoria Bellotti
Laura Dabbish
David Kirk
mc schraefel

Subcommittee:

Michael Massimi
Marianna Obrist
Mark Rouncefield
William Odom
Judd Antin
Claire O'Malley
Danae Stanton Fraser
Luigina Ciolfi
Antti Oulasvirta
Jennifer Golbeck
Mark Perry
Keith Cheverst
Paul André
Natasa Milic-Frayling
Amy Voida
David Randall
Hao-Chuan Wang
Coye Cheshire
Eytan Adar
Ravin Balakrishnan
Duncan Brumby
Yunan Chen
Lorrie Cranor
Darren Gergle
Mark Hancock
Beverly Harrison
Eva Hornecker
Gary Hsieh
Kori Inkpen
Paul Marshall
Sameer Patil
Abigail Sellen

Example Papers:

Interaction Techniques and Devices

This subcommittee will focus on contributions in the form of new input or interaction techniques, or devices. These contributions will be judged in part based on their novelty or on a demonstrated improvement in an existing interaction type of interest to the HCI community. Example areas include but are not limited to: new sensors and actuators, mobile devices, 3-D interaction, touch and multi-touch, graphical and tangible UI, tabletop and large display interaction.

Chairs:

Shahram Izadi
Steven Feiner

Subcommittee:

Alex Olwal
Per Ola Kristensson
Yang Li
Otmar Hilliges
Tomer Moscovich
Pourang Irani
David Kim
Eve Hoggan
Daniel Wigdor
Fanny Chevalier
Morgan Dixon
Yuichiro Takeuchi
Jonathan Hook
Sebastian Boring
Nicolai Marquardt
Daniel Vogel
Kent Lyons
Nick Chen
Rajinder Sodhi

Technology, Systems and Engineering

This subcommittee will focus on technology, systems and engineering contributions that enable, improve, or advance interaction. This will include software and hardware technologies and systems that enable and demonstrate novel interactive capabilities, as well as languages, methods and tools for construction and engineering of interactive systems. Engineering contributions should clearly demonstrate how they address interactive systems concerns such as, for example, scalability, reliability, interoperability, testing, and performance. Systems and technology contributions will be judged by their technical innovation and/or ability to connect, simplify or enrich interactions, for example in intelligent interfaces and mobile/ubiquitous computing.

Chairs:

Antonio Krueger
Fabio Paterno

Subcommittee:

Jörg Müller
Anne Roudaut
Jeffrey Bigham
James Scott
Michelle Zhou
Xiang Cao
Daniel Ashbrook
Michael Nebeling
Kris Luyten
Jeffrey Nichols

Example Papers: